Should there be more variety in school curriculums?

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Should there be more variety in school curriculums?

Jordan Garner, Op-ed Editor

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“I’ve been making a list of the things they don’t teach you at school. They don’t teach you how to love somebody. They don’t teach you how to be famous. They don’t teach you how to be rich or how to be poor. They don’t teach you how to walk away from someone you don’t love any longer. They don’t teach you how to know what’s going on in someone else’s mind. They don’t teach you what to say to someone who’s dying. They don’t teach you anything worth knowing.” – Quote from Neil Gaiman, The Sandman, Vol. 9: The Kindly Ones

Along with the original required classes of history, English, and math, many modern day high schools offer students a variety of electives, from different art, language, or even music courses. But is this variety really enough? Shouldn’t modern day high schools offer courses that will really prepare students for life outside of high school, not just the basics on Shakespeare and all the math that’s going to be used on a daily basis (said no one ever)?

Many students may hear their parents talk about their high school experience, where they had a cooking class and driver’s education to be permitted a beginner’s license right from school. These are only two examples of classes that are helpful for the years beyond high school. With all the recent school shootings and even the daily occurrences of people getting mugged, schools might even offer different types of self-defense classes for those who’d be interested. This could help students feel ultimately safer. Including self-defense, schools could offer more interesting courses for students to attain their physical education credits apart from just the status quo. Why not spice things up a bit and offer something like archery (not with real bows of course), or even just classes focusing on specific sports? This could be beneficial to students who may not have the time or money to participate in sports outside of school.

With most Americans adding debt faster than savings, another topic that should be addressed in high schools is money management, how to intelligently handle the transition between having no bills to having what may seem like endless bills.

By offering a wider and maybe more ‘creative’ variety of courses in schools, both teachers as well as students would benefit and students could be more prepared for life beyond high school.

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