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Why is our generation the apathetic, enabled generation that we are?

Meriah Rodriguez, Staff Reporter

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My generation of young adults knows more about the Kardashians than they know about their rights. My generation cares more about their phones than their health. My generation lives and breathes social media rather than life itself. It seems like everyone wants to be rich and famous, travel th

Eva Rinaldi
Kim Kardashian smiles for the camera.

e world, and buy designer clothes, but no one knows what to do or how to do it. 

Generations before us see us as weak, helpless, dependent teens who know how to change a coil to vape and name a series of vape juice flavors but couldn’t drive a stick to save their lives. We expect so much, but work for so little. We want it all but don’t want to give it our all. We want the dream without the commitment.

Laziness, desire, and dread. Anxiety and depression among teens have skyrocketed, resulting in nicotine and drug use, excessive use of social media, and other harmful outlets used to fill the void created by the lack of purpose and sense of self.

Although other forms of substance abuse have statistically decreased or holding steady, after alcohol, vaping is the most common used substance among students. In just this past year, rates of vaping increased by 33 percent in both middle schools and high schools according to the National Institute on Drug Use.

The percentage of teens with mental health disorders has “more than doubled over the past decade, according to a new study from the American Psychological Association(APA)”, Fox News reported in March.

APA studies also report a 33 percent increase in suicide from 1999 through 2017, suicide being the second leading cause of death for 10- to 34-year-olds, and ranking as the 10th leading cause of death overall.

There is no one culprit for an increase in depression, substance abuse and suicides, but it is argued that ” these “deaths of despair” are linked to a deterioration of economic and social well-being(APA).”

The older generations are so quick to condemn, but he who casts the stone is to blame.

The world around us seems to literally be burning before our eyes. Global warming seems an unstoppable force as warming seas continue to rise, glaciers melt, and forests disappear.The government, industries, and our own president stubbornly ignore such a crisis. College tuition has increased eight times faster than wages, and there are more baby boomers ready to retire than there are young adult to pay for their social security.

Our generation is suffocating. We bear the consequences of the policies we did not vote for. Humankind will die by the hands of humankind.

In terms of our social well-being, society is flawed in numerous ways from beauty standards to public figures. Idolization of sex, money, and drugs, ignorance of circumstances, lifestyles, and cultures, ideology that is outdated and irrelevant to today’s constantly changing environment, all contribute to our not so well-being. But it’s not just the world, it’s our own home.

Nurture shapes the character, work ethic, and stability a child will have in adulthood.

Lack thereof deprives children of their most basic needs for emotional and mental health. It takes a village to raise a child. It takes a mother, a father, a teacher, a punisher, a motivator, a judge, a friend. All of which are what a parent should be, much of which our parents were not, at least not how they should have been.

My siblings stare at a screen for several hours every day. Motivation is not in their dictionary, and they both struggled throughout high school, as I’m sure many can relate. The freedom of non-parental influence seems preferable, but it is not what is best for us.  My mother does what she needs to for us, providing a roof, food, and clothing, but what she should do, as all parents should, goes far beyond necessity.

To instill ethics, character, and stability is what a parent should do. By showing children the importance of their rights and knowledge, to not be ignorant, to know what is going on around them and in the world, to take initiative and work hard, is what a parent should do.

No child likes to sit through lectures, get punished for bad behavior, study for exams, or think about the future. But every child needs to in order to grow into a responsible, independent young adult.

If you grow a flower in sunlight and sufficient water, it will bloom beautifully. But if you grow a flower in shade and neglect, it will wither and decay. 

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